I Should Never Have To Write A Post About Demonic Possession

I could write something really long and snarky about this idiotic Washington Post column about a psychiatrist who has patients he claims are demonically possessed. Instead, if anyone is interested, they can do the detailed critique themselves.

But what I wrote about the decline of UFOs in American culture seems appropriate:

What used to be a pop culture reference point has pretty much vanished–and I don’t think it’s just the end of the X-Files. The key thing is ubiquitous photography and video in the form of cell phones (and digital handcams). If UFO visitations were real (for sake of argument), with all of the recording power the average citizen has at her disposal, we should have had some pretty conclusive evidence by now. As Nadia Drake notes, we don’t. At all.

In an era of ubiquitous cell phone cameras, one would think someone would have captured levitation due to demonic possession on video. And the argument that similarity in stories constitutes some sort of proof is absurd: it’s called culture. Demonic possessions are supposed to happen in a certain way, and, lo and behold, they do.

Fuck you Jeff Bezos.

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4 Responses to I Should Never Have To Write A Post About Demonic Possession

  1. “And the argument that similarity in stories constitutes some sort of proof is absurd: it’s called culture.”
    Except when it comes to allegations of sexual misconduct against a celebrity, though, because then it’s “where there’s smoke, there’s fire”, right?

  2. Kevskos says:

    There is a big difference between shared cultural phenomenon and allegations about an individual person.

  3. PlainT says:

    Wow. I can’t believe we are still having this argument.

    On the one hand, that man’s basic premise is correct: if someone is in pain try to help them, and if they need spiritual guidance then sure. On the other hand, attributing symptoms to demonic possession is a huge leap of logic.

    So much in his story has been used before: someone in a position of authority claims to know more than other people, claims to be more open-minded than other people (to an idea that other people have rejected as unsound), claims to have a reputation for being a skeptic (as the first priest who came to him told him). Also the claim that he has evidence that some supernatural phenomenon (levitation) happens although he himself hasn’t seen it (but has heard of other people who have).

    Even though you’ve said/thought everything there is to say/think on this matter, here’s another great discussion as well: http://theness.com/neurologicablog/index.php/a-psychiatrist-falls-for-exorcism/

  4. spoke says:

    I was under the impression everyone was aware of how demons usually jam cameras before initiating the levitation thingy..

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