Some Post-Election Thoughts

In no particular order:

  1. This is a disaster. For those who remember the Reagan era, every branch of government will be run by the 2016 versions of James Watt.
  2. Twenty years ago, when Republicans stymied Clinton and the Democrats, I thought there was time. Maybe we would get things today, but twenty years later, we would make progress. We might be looking at another twenty years. I will literally be an old man before we turn this around.
  3. The Supreme Court stays conservative for another generation.
  4. We will have a serial groper as president. Say what one will about Bush 43, I never thought a fifteen year old girl would be in danger if she were in a room by herself with him.
  5. I think we’ll see increased violence against minorities, ethnic and religious (which includes me).
  6. Right-wing cops have just been given the green light to be awful.
  7. I hate to say this, but if you’re a woman who is able to have kids, you might want to think about an IUD (if you’re not planning on getting pregnant). Roe v. Wade will likely be dead once Roberts becomes the center of the Supreme Court.
  8. Maybe shitting all over white working class voters–who were 25 to 34 percent of Obama’s voters in 2012–wasn’t a great move after all. We needed to keep those voters, and it seems we didn’t. Areas that Obama won handily–white working class areas–broke very hard for Trump relative to 2008 and 2012. Simple explanations of racism don’t seem to account for this.
  9. At least last night, CNN exit polls claimed only one out of three non-college educated white women voted for Clinton. Is this sexism/misogyny?
  10. Trump also killed among voters who said their personal financial status had worsened during the last four years. Maybe all those jokes about ‘economic anxiety’ missed something.
  11. This is my personal crazy theory–everyone gets one–but recounts are really going to matter. They really do need to be done.
  12. Despite the use of intersectionality during the Democratic primary, ‘racists are gonna racist‘ probably isn’t the best framework for understanding what happened.
  13. I’ve said from the get-go that Clinton gave me a Martha Coakley vibe. We are definitely having that conversation about ‘electability’ again.

Obviously, more to write later, but that’s enough for now.

Truly depressing.

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17 Responses to Some Post-Election Thoughts

  1. Martha Coakley – ouch.

    And probably an apt comparison.

    • Chris G says:

      I thought of Coakley too,

      Off-topic re Coakley: Some friends from town worked with her on a committee to build a “Fallen Heroes” memorial. (They lost their son in Iraq in 2003. I’m 98% certain this is the memorial they were involved with – https://www.massfallenheroes.org/memorial/) They said she always showed up ready to work. She never sought attention for herself. She just rolled up her sleeves and took on whatever task was at hand. They couldn’t imagine a better person to work with but the positive traits she exhibited in that setting never translated into her being a good candidate for Senator or Governor. Makes me wonder if Clinton had/has positive personal traits which just never translated.

  2. joey says:

    I like all of this, and particularly like #4. Parties and policies are one thing, common decency another.

  3. Gingerbaker says:

    The DNC and the Democratic Party establishment insiders lost this election, like so many before it, because neoliberalism is corrupt insider’s game and a failure to the working class and poor. The Democratic Party I knew would never have championed NAFTA, welfare reform, ObamaCare. They would have fought to the death to protect unions.

    The only positive outcome I can see from this debacle is that we have the opportunity to reform the Democratic Party and I would suggest that we let Bernie do it.

    That would be the Bernie that was thrown under the bus, despite consistently winning poll after poll against all comers but was christened “Unelectable” by the DNC. The most popular politician in the country.

    More importantly, he is the man whose platform is embraced by a huge majority of the demographic future of our country and proven effective throughout the civilized world.. That Bernie.

    • David Taylor, MD says:

      I agree completely with your dismay over Bernie’s treatment, but keep in mind that the RNC wanted Trump out as well, and look how he prevailed. Is one lesson here that political parties have less power than we imagine? Trump was winning primaries when Bernie was not.

      • Gingerbaker says:

        Bernie was not winning some primaries because of the DNC!

        The DNC blew it not just in their treatment of Bernie, they blew it because they were blind to the fact that their candidate epitomises exactly what frustrates Trump voters. I found this article very enlightening:

        http://www.alternet.org/election-2016/death-democratic-party-death-liberal-media-and-way-bernie-would-have-won

        • David Taylor, MD says:

          I still do not see a clear line between the DNC and primaries in which Bernie lost. My point was that the argument seems to be that Bernie lost in the primaries because of treatment by the DNC, but Trump won in the primaries despite his treatment by the RNC. We can’t have it both ways without being more precise about what exactly the DNC and the RNC were doing.

          I agree that the DNC — and perhaps Democrats in general — blew it with their treatment of Bernie, but that’s a different issue.

  4. John Danley says:

    Is there a silver lining to any of this? No, but there is an orange sparkleturd on the horizon. Welcome to the Do Lung Bridge to nowhere.

  5. sglover says:

    Dem ineptitude has brought us another disaster, and this one might make us **nostalgic** for the days of Bush the Lesser!!!

    Naturally, Dems being Dems, the most important thing is to blame everyone else. Check out Saint Krugman’s twitter feed. Early on he was smearing the Greens for Clinton’s loss in Florida. The really beautiful part is that Stein votes were maybe **half** of the margin between Trump and Clinton. Meanwhile the libertarians got about **three times** as many votes as the Greens — votes that almost certainly would have added to the Republican margin.

    So it seems like every believing Dem’s favorite “Nobel Prize” economist has a problem with elementary arithmetic. Not to mention basic integrity — this is all of a piece with his earlier Big Lie smears against Sanders.

    Clinton lost Pennsylvania, for God’s sake! It looks like she didn’t even carry Philly!!! How the hell do you pull **that** off?!?!?

    I hope this ends the Democratic Party and its hangers-on. They deserve it.

  6. John Deamer says:

    Has any reliable source run an analysis of what Bernie’s performance might have been against Trump in this election? Somehow I doubt that the strange currents driving the Pumpkin voters were likely to be influenced by Bernie, anymore than they were by Hillary. Also, I’m very curious about statistical analysis of the vote count, looking for suspicious pro-Pumpkin patterns. You remember those that were found in the Kansas cacaus in the 2012 primary.

    • Gingerbaker says:

      There were many polls done during the Dem. primary. Bernie consistently beat all Republicans by wide margins, outperforming Clinton by a wide margin. The DNC really did throw the best candidate under the bus.

  7. sglover says:

    I like your site a lot, so please take this as constructive criticism: It seems to me that one small gesture you can make to help pull us out of the wreckage is, quit linking to Vox. I’ve never found their content very good to begin with, but there’s more to it than that. What there is of an American left has just suffered a severe setback, thanks in great measure to a self-involved and self-promoting Dem establishment. Now if self-involved self-promotion isn’t the very essence of Vox, what is? That rag had an outsized role in spawning the Clinton disaster — do you honestly believe that the career ambitions of Klein and Yggie weren’t central to that?

    Cut ’em loose!

  8. Jay says:

    Clinton’s legacy will now be that out of pride and unfettered personal ambition she has set back progressive ideals for at least a generation. Next time someone cries electability to me I’m going to punch them.

  9. John Danley says:

    Wasn’t crazy about Kaine either. But, my non-existent god, is this what I have to look forward to before turning 50? I’m not sure if it could be any worse if a mutated hybrid of Alex Jones, Carrot Top, and Tom Metzger became POTUS.

  10. Vickie Feminist says:

    The NRA, the Koch brothers $, Robert Mercer and his data analytics and $ meant that while the RNC & Trump had no ground game, evil others did. One Florida exit poll found that 8% of the Republicans had been contacted. The NRA has an amazingly effective field operation and has had it for over 30 years.

    The national TV news teams and NPR normalized Trump at every turn and totally ignored the Russian aspects. Meanwhile the Grey Lady stabbed HRC at every turn.

    She had great ads and a highly organized well run campaign. The USA is simply sexist and racist and anti-Semitic to a degree we can not comprehend. And Bernie? even his Congressional work group did not endorse him. he only polled well because the Right and their media friends had not turned on him yet. Remember war hero John Kerry and swiftboating?

    • Gingerbaker says:

      Bernie polled well despite the left media and the DNC having turned on him. Krugman sold his soul, publishing sheer nonsense about how what has been working wonderfully in Europe is impossible. The Washington Post ran something like 17 anti-Bernie articles in a row.

      He remains the most popular politician in the country, not only because he has very low negatives, but because he has significant appeal to Independents and Republicans alike. More importantly, he represents the key to understanding how to get us out of this mess. And that is to reject neoliberalism.

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