The Tea Party Republican War on Libraries

In the Great State of Kentucky, it appears that the Tea Party has been fighting a long battle against the tyranny of the public library–and it’s based on venality and stupidity (like that’s a surprise. First, the venality–because the stupidity is so overwhelming (we need to start slow; boldface mine):

In September 2012 the Library Board of Pulaski County, Kentucky raised property taxes $1 per year for a typical homeowner to maintain the existing level of services in its five libraries. Voters were not given the opportunity to reject the increase; in 2006 however, they were and resoundingly approved a much larger increase to finance a new library…

Pulaski County Tea Partiers, justifying their fury by noting the $1 increase had not been voted on by the people began circulating a petition to dissolve the library tax district completely. The effort’s leader declared her group would stop accumulating signatures only if all members of the current library board resigned.

The board did not resign and ultimately the petitioners found they had too little time to gather the necessary signatures. But the Tea Party had demonstrated its strength and revealed its willingness to use scorched earth tactics.

A year before the Pulaski library district raised property taxes without asking voter permission, the Campbell County Library Board proposed a $20-per-year tax increase to finance the construction of a new library in the underserved southern part of the county. It would submit the proposal to voters on the November 2012 ballot.

In six public hearings Tea Party members tried to stop the project from being on the ballot. When they failed they asked a lawyer to identify ways to halt the project. He came across a 1964 statute that prohibited library taxing district formed by a petition from voters—as the Campbell County district was—to change its tax rate without a petition signed by at least 51 percent of voters in the last election. In January 2012, 11 months before the voters were to decide the issue (they rejected the project) several Tea Party members went to court. A few months later Tea Party members in Kenton, a neighboring county, did the same.

The Tea Partyers have had some success at court. Their response:

After the first court decision Eric Hermes, one of the lead plaintiffs in the original lawsuit proclaimed, “The people of Campbell County won.” To him the Tea Party had struck a blow for freedom. “Our country was founded upon those taking action against tyrannic government.”

Ok, so being cheap, miserable sons-of-bitches while wrapping themselves in the flag (FREEDOM! WOLVERINES!!) is par for the course for these assholes. But I promised you stupid, and, well, we got the stupid. Burning, blazing stupid:

On the Northern Kentucky Tea Party blog, Legate Damar asks, “Why should my neighbors be able to rent non-educational DVDs and video games at a cost to the taxpayer when I rent mine at Redbox? Redbox charges a $1.27 per movie including taxes which I think is a steal.”

YOU DON’T RENT THINGS FROM THE LIBRARY. WHEN IT’S YOUR TURN, YOU BORROW THEM. THEN YOU GIVE THEM BACK. ALL OF US CAN DO THIS OVER AND OVER AGAIN.

This includes ‘non-educational’ books by the way. Admittedly, there are some downsides. You have to give the free stuff back. Also, you might catch Liberal cooties, but that’s the risk I suppose.

I don’t even know how one is supposed to reach out to someone who won’t pay one dollar to support public libraries, but will pay a private company much more for the same services.

Lo, there are assholes and they walk among us.

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4 Responses to The Tea Party Republican War on Libraries

  1. John Danley says:

    Who needs to borrow Tolstoy when you can rent the latest, non-educational action film? Tea Turds would rather drool on the wheels of their Rascal Scooters than pick up a book.

  2. David says:

    Of course the Tea Party opposes libraries, as they were started in this country by that great anti-american, Ben Franklin.

  3. albanaeon says:

    Funny how the TPer assumes his neighbor isn’t also a taxpaying citizen and would therefore be using a service that they paid for. A service as a taxpayer, he could take advantage of himself.

    But of course only he and his ilk could possibly be Real Tax Payin’ Amerikuns so it’d be better to burn the whole thing to the ground than take advantage of next best thing to free media.

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