Category Archives: Genomics

Not Everyone Who Wants To Look At Genomic Data Is a Researcher

Well, this is disturbing (boldface mine): When companies like and 23andMe first invited people to send in their DNA for genealogy tracing and medical diagnostic tests, privacy advocates warned about the creation of giant genetic databases that might one … Continue reading

Posted in Civil Liberties, Genomics

NCBI To Rename Incorrect Genomes…

…microbiologists everywhere rejoice. I spent part of last week at the ASM Conference on Rapid Next-Generation Sequencing and Bioinformatic Pipelines for Enhanced Molecular Epidemiologic Investigation of Pathogens, which for obvious reasons is also referred to as ASMNGS. Lots of good … Continue reading

Posted in Genomics, NIH, Speciation | 3 Comments

How You ‘Pre-Treat’ Your Data Really Matters (It’s Not the P-Hacking)

There’s an 538 article “Science Isn’t Broken” that’s winding its way through the tubes of the internet. It has a cool ‘p-hacking’ interactive feature, which is probably why most of the associated commentary has focused on the problem of p-hacking … Continue reading

Posted in Education, Genomics, Statistics

A Question About Oxford Nanopore and the Cost Model

This is the first mention of how much the much-vaunted Oxford Nanopore sequencing technology might cost (boldface mine): Oxford Nanopore said last month that it plans to make the MinIon sequencer commercially available through the MinIon Access Program. Customers need … Continue reading

Posted in Genomics, Public Health | 4 Comments

Thoughts on the Promises of Big Genomics

Last week, David Dobbs wrote a piece about Big Genomics, in which he took a critical look at the Human Genome Project (‘HGP’). Below are some thoughts about his piece and ‘Big Genomics’; this shouldn’t be construed as a ‘response’: … Continue reading

Posted in Genomics | 5 Comments

A Visual Image of What “Understand the Limitations of Your Data” Means

One of the things I’ve repeated on this blog a few times is people have to like this crap you have to understand the limitations of your data. In a good Nature piece about how the problems with using p-values … Continue reading

Posted in Genomics, Statistics | 1 Comment

Misunderstanding the Progression of Big Science

In an interesting article about large-scale science projects (aka ‘Big Science’), Tim Requarth wrote this, which seems to have received a lot of support in the intertoobz (or at least the Twitterz; boldface mine): But here may be the real … Continue reading

Posted in Genomics